Past Themes

12 RESULTS
A Church for the World 35.3 | Fall 2017

A Church for the World 35.3 | Fall 2017

Purchase a single copy of our fall 2017 issue. This issue is all about the church: what it is, what it isn’t, and why it matters. Our concern isn’t just an apologetic for the public importance of the church. It raises important questions internal to the church—questions about reform and renewal. The health of society and the strength of social architecture depend on having churches that are centered on the supremacy of Christ, because to serve the Lord is to serve the world. It’s not if church is for the world, but how.

Beyond Ideologies 39.4 | Fall 2021

Beyond Ideologies 39.4 | Fall 2021

Purchase a single copy of our fall 2021 issue. We live in an era when seemingly every human issue is viewed through an ideological lens. Utopic in flavour and aim, airtight in answers, and more attune to systems of thought and social order than respectful of the irreducible complexity of human beings, ideologies are often unhelpful and perniciously detached from reality. Yet are we inevitably situated in a stream of assumptions we’ve inherited about human flourishing and the good society, or can we forge a healthier, more humane path? This issue seeks to encourage you, our readers, to reimagine with us a new stream that cuts a little closer to the canon of Christian social thought—a canon that has always been ideologically heterodox, personalist, and alive.

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Embodiment 39.3 | Summer 2021

Embodiment 39.3 | Summer 2021

Purchase a single copy of our summer 2021 issue. While there are many ways to interpret the markers of “progress” over the last millennium, one line stretching east along the x axis is the gradual displacement of bodies. Without quite realizing it, many of us pre-pandemic were starting to believe that bodily limitations could be cast aside in the quest for more—ignoring the boringly basic needs of our human bodies and their rhythms.

And so this year of death and disease has offered, in a tragically revealing way, a severe mercy of course correction. We’ve realized that embodiment is not actually a hurdle to overcome, but the very yeast for flourishing itself. How will we allow this to reshape our understanding of the good life? Will our app designers and urban planners, theories of change and individual habits reflect this recovery of our creatureliness, of givenness and finitude?

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Love and Fear 37.3 | Fall 2019

Love and Fear 37.3 | Fall 2019

Purchase a single copy of our fall 2019 issue. Noli timere. Be not afraid. This command pervades the Scriptures, and yet many in Western societies are engulfed in a sense that doom is near and what was will no longer be. There is fracture and pain exploding out into the open—for some it’s long-rumbling, for others it’s a shock. Almost everyone feels besieged and misunderstood, reduced to a caricature and cut off without grace. But emerging from this morass is a call to a new kind of engagement with one another, one that Comment would like to answer with a long and unpredictable table that seats elite next to commoner, scholar next to practitioner, black next to white, able-bodied next to handicapped, young next to old, rich next to poor, privileged next to overlooked, immigrant next to indigenous. What does it require to be repairers of the breach? How can a magazine informed by 2,000 years of Christian social thought help us tend to the task? This print issue opens up these questions, inviting an exploration of the fears and loves that compete for eminence in a nation, a neighborhood, a society, a soul.

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Minimalism 36.4 | Winter 2018

Minimalism 36.4 | Winter 2018

Purchase a single copy of our winter 2018 issue. Minimalism is making its mark on society, one tiny succulent at a time. What does that mean for Christians? The North American church surely does overconsume. Perhaps embracing simplicity could be countercultural and lead us toward certain kinds of holiness and obedience that we’re lacking. Yet things are still at the centre of this new movement that is purportedly anti-consumerist, and might hospitality suffer when we decide that having “extra” is uniformly bad? Among the faith-motivated and others, some adopt minimalism to be on trend, but still others are embracing some really beautiful practices for beautiful reasons, even godly ones.

Navigating Uncertainty 38.4 | Fall 2020

Navigating Uncertainty 38.4 | Fall 2020

If 2020 is defined by one thing, it’s the ushering in of mass uncertainty. Uncertainty about how to behave in the face of a capricious virus, about the future, about whom to trust in the face of conflicting directives. What happens when a society that thought it was successful is shocked into realizing that it can no longer assume an infinitely upward path of progress? What happens to human character when we lose confidence in the same? This fall issue of Comment is an attempt to explore these questions with both honesty and tenderness. We are seeking wisdom from untapped sources—children, jazz, mathematics, cultures adept at thinking in the present tense, refugees, the materially poor. What can we learn from these ignored sages, and from the biblical narrative of exile itself?

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Rebuilding Trust 39.1 | Winter 2021

Rebuilding Trust 39.1 | Winter 2021

We are living through times that often feel like one long commentary on Joni Mitchell’s line “you don’t know what you got till it’s gone.” From regular encounters on the street to public sacraments, hospitality in the flesh to basic truth-telling from our leaders, it is not the sophisticated accoutrements of an advanced civilization that have screamed in their absence, but rather the rudimentary things we ordinarily take for granted. And among these invisible “essentials” is something increasingly at risk: trust. Symptoms of the rot abound, and just in the nick of time, many cultural observers are starting to take notice. We commend the diagnostic literature to you, but what this winter issue of Comment does is brave the “what now?” question: What might it take to build some trust back in to our withered commons, and for those who have never tasted trust’s rewards, sow it reliably for the first time?

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Remember the Spheres 40.2 | Spring 2022

Remember the Spheres 40.2 | Spring 2022

Purchase a single copy of our spring 2022 issue. The world is not just flat, it’s flattened. Globalization, social media, ever-proliferating confessional pluralism and an erosion in the authority of coherence-lending institutions are just a few of the trends that have together conspired to bulldoze a historical understanding of civil spheres and their attendant norms. College faculty increasingly understand their roles to be those of advocates and activists more than they do as seekers of understanding. Debates around critical theory have spilled into the public domain via hot takes when the tools for using it fruitfully are known only by a trained few. There is widespread cultural confusion over the distinction between public and private, vulnerability and restraint. Churches are defined more by their politics than by their creedal confession. And so on.

In all of this, we no longer seem to be asking that most vital question that gets at directive notions of telos, namely, What is an education for? What is the family for? What is the church for?

This issue seeks to remind us of a toolkit we actually have at our disposal if we but widen our apertures to recognize the multi-dimensional lives most of us actually lead. We are inviting you, our reader, into a rediscovery of the many spheres beckoning for your participation as a way of disrupting the dysfunction we see all around.

The Dynamics of Moral Agency 39.2 | Spring 2021

The Dynamics of Moral Agency 39.2 | Spring 2021

We live in an era newly awash in moral language when it comes to the systemic and the social. Frameworks of white supremacy and systemic racism, illegitimate political authority and a corrupted elite dominate our mental maps, each charge vast yet pointed, weighty yet difficult to pin down. As many of us awaken to realities of history that seem to be demanding something new from our lives, the conscientious person is asking, Where is the way of wisdom? How do I avoid becoming paralyzed, or worse, reactive and destructive? What’s the call on persons when the stakes most discussed are not automatically accountable to a person? Is there a call?

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The Gift Logic 40.1 | Winter 2022

The Gift Logic 40.1 | Winter 2022

Purchase a single copy of our winter 2022 issue. We tend to think of generosity as a virtue for the privileged, assuming that gifts are a kind of life décor, not something which could live viably at the core. But what if we’re missing out by resigning gifts to the periphery? What if we have sidestepped gift as the truest and most life-giving law there is? Comment is taking this question seriously because the air feels stagnant and so much in our political culture and relational reality is near a snapping point. The winter issue explores: Is a gift economy possible, and what is it, really? How might more real-world experiences of the gift logic shift our ideals of what kind of leadership is needed to serve the commons effectively in our time? What is the texture of formation that has given shape to those who become willing to die so that others might live?

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